Apple Watch Battery

Apple Watch runs on a rechargeable battery. In order to get the most use and enjoyment out of the device, it must be recharged every day.

Apple Watch Battery

Battery Runtime

iPhone uses more power because of Apple Watch, as the devices communicate via Bluetooth. Beside, Apple Watch makes iPhone to connect to the Internet to download data. All these actions reduce iPhone’s runtime on battery. On the other side, it’s very likely that the owner will use Apple Watch instead of iPhone for sending messages, checking his or her e-mail and notifications. In these cases the watch even saves some battery life and thus the effect on the battery life might well work out to be even positive.

The battery in Apple Watch can manage 18 hours of normal use, up to 6,5 hours of audio playback or workout, 3 hours of talk time. It can last up to 48 hours of using only the watch face, or up to 72 hours of using the device in Power Reserve Mode. In short, Apple Watch needs recharging every day, as the battery can last for a full day of intensive work and wear, but no longer.

The 42 mm Apple Watch has a larger battery than the 38 mm Apple Watch. As a result, it gets better runtime.

Charging Apple Watch

You can charge the watch any time you find it convenient. However Apple suggests charging Apple Watch at night. This suggestion makes sense if the owner wants to use the activity-tracking features consistently throughout the day.

To charge the watch, connect the charger to a power source, and then connect the MagSafe charging connector to Apple Watch.

It is possible to do this either by placing the charging connector on a surface and then laying Apple Watch faceup on it, or laying Apple Watch facedown on a soft and stable surface and moving the magnetic side of the connector on a surface and then laying Apple Watch faceup on it. Either way, the connector snaps automatically into place via magnets.

Apple Watch begins charging. At this moment the device emits a short sound. If you do not hear the sound, check that the charger is correctly connected and that the power source is delivering power to the device.

Apple Watch uses fast charging to the 80% level from 0. This process takes about one hour and a half. Then the watch charges more slowly, and it takes another hour to charge to 100%, that’s around 2 and a half hours in total.

Note that while Apple Watch is charging, any alarm whose time arrives, as well as any timer that finishes its countdown plays its sound even if the owner has turned on Do Not Disturb Mode.

Charging Strategies

By understanding what consumes the most power, the owner can develop smart charging strategies to ensure that he or she has power when they need it.

You can charge Apple Watch whenever you are not wearing it. Even 15 or 20 minutes charging boost the runtime considerably.

Beware of third-party chargers that claim to deliver a charge faster than the Apple-provided charger. In fact, a badly designed charger might not only damage Apple Watch but it also might be an electrical hazard or void the warranty of your Apple Watch.

Using Power Reserve Mode

Apple Watch includes Power Reserve Mode for conserving power when the battery is running low. This mode turns on automatically when the battery level goes below 10 percent. Power Reserve Mode turns off all features except timekeeping, but this function is fulfilled through a stripped-down digital display.

You can enable Power Reserve Mode manually at any point (for example, when you know that you will not be able to charge the watch for some long period of time).

Enabling Power Reserve Mode Manually

  • Press and hold the side button.
  • When you see Power screen, tap Power Reserve and slide it to the right. The screen will go blank.
  • Click the side button. The time appears on the screen as a digital readout.
  • To turn off Power Reserve Mode, press and hold the side button, and Apple Watch restarts.
  • Tap the watch face and type your passcode on the Enter Passcode screen to unlock the Apple watch. Now you can resume using Apple Watch as always.

To learn more: Read How to Extend Battery Runtime.

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