History of Apple (2000)

In 2000, Apple announced a slew of new machines, including the PowerMac G4 Cube, which added a fifth category to Apple’s four-corner product strategy. The Cube was the biggest gamble Steve Jobs had made since the release of the iMac, and it would turn out to be a failure.

History of the Apple Computer Corporation

2000

January 2000: eMachines agrees to Apple Computer’s demand to stop manufacturing and sale of the eOne computer.

January 2000: Judge John Koeltl of US District Court of New York dismisses a lawsuit of Imatec against Apple Computer over ColorSync software.

January 2000: Apple begins shipping an iBook computer featuring 64 MB RAM, 300 MHz G3 processor, 6 GB hard drive, 24X CD-ROM drive, built-in 10.100 BaseT Ethernet, 56Kbps modem, 2X AGP ATI Rage Mobility graphics controller with 4 MB RAM, USB port, 12.1-inch 800×600 resolution active matrix display, tangerine or blueberry color case, for US$1599.

January 2000: Apple begins shipping the iBook Special Edition, like the regular iBook but with 366 MHz G3 processor, graphite and ice color case, for US$1799.

January 5, 2000: At the Macworld Expo, Apple Computer publicly demonstrates Mac OS X for the first time. Steve Jobs announces that he is accepting the position as full-time CEO of Apple Computer.

February 22, 2000: Apple introduces the PowerBook G3/500 portable computer. It features 500 MHz G3 processor, 128 MB RAM, ATI Rage Mobility 128 graphics controller, 6 GB hard drive, DVD-ROM drive. Price is US$3499.

March 8, 2000: Apple settles lawsuits out-of-court against Future Power over E-Power computers that Apple claimed copied the look of Apple’s iMac.

March 28, 2000: Microsoft releases the Internet Explorer 5 Web browser for Apple Macintosh computers. The software requires Mac OS 7.6.1 or later. New features include a new rendering engine, 50 percent faster than version 4.5, and more accurate rendering.

March 29, 2000: Apple Computer introduces the Power Macintosh G4/500 computer. It features DVD-RAM drive, 256 MB RAM, graphite case, two USB ports, three FireWire ports, 27 MB hard drive, Zip drive, three PCI slots, ATI Rage 128 Pro AGP graphics, keyboard, mouse. Price is US$3499.

May 2000: Apple Canada releases the PowerBook portable computer, with PowerPC G3 processor at speeds of 400 MHz or 500 MHz. Prices are CDN$3699 and CDN$5199 respectively.

May 15, 2000: In San Jose, California, the Apple Worldwide Developers Conference is held. At the Apple Worldwide Developers Conference, Apple Computer releases Mac OS X DR 4 (fourth developer release) to 4000 software developers.

July 2000: Apple begins shipping the first personal computers with standard dual processors, the Power Mac G4 with dual 450 or 500 MHz processors.

July 2000: Apple releases the iMac DV computer. It features a 400 MHz PowerPC G3 processor, 64 MB RAM, FireWire connector, iMovie2 software, AirPort wireless networking support. It is available in an indigo or ruby color case. Price is US$999.

July 2000: Apple releases the iMac DV plus computer. It features a 450 MHz PowerPC G3 processor, FireWire connector, 64 MB RAM, 20 GB hard drive, DVD-ROM drive, iMovie2 software, AirPort wireless networking support. It is available in an indigo, sage, or ruby color case. Price is US$1299.

July 2000: Apple releases the iMac DV Special Edition computer. It features a 500 MHz PowerPC G3 processor, FireWire connector, 128 MB RAM, 30 GB hard drive, iMovie2 software, AirPort wireless networking support. It is available in a graphite or snow color case. Price is US$1499.

July 19, 2000: At the Macworld Expo show, Apple Computer introduces the PowerMac G4 Cube. It features 450 MHz PowerPC G4 processor with Velocity Engine, 64 MB RAM, 20 GB hard drive, DVD drive, two FireWire ports, two USB ports, 10/100Base-T Ethernet, 56 kbps v.90 modem. The main system unit is enclosed in an 8-inch clear case, with air flow designed to eliminate the need for a cooling fan. Price is US$1799. Price for a 500 MHz version is US$2299.

July 19, 2000: At the Macworld Expo show, Apple Computer announces a new low-cost iMac computer. It features 350 MHz processor, 64 MB RAM, 7.5 GB hard drive, CD-ROM drive, in indigo blue case. Price is to be US$799 when the system ships in September.

July 20, 2000: At the Macworld Expo show, Apple Computer announces the Apple Pro Mouse, with no buttons, and an elliptical shape.

August 2000: Apple introduces an updated iMac computer, with 350 MHz G3 processor and indigo case. Price is US$799.

August 2000: Apple Computer introduces an updated iMac Special Edition computer, with 400 MHz G3 processor, FireWire port, video-out port, CD-ROM drive, and indigo or ruby case. Price is US$999.

August 29, 2000: Apple announces that profits for the latest quarter year will not meet expectations. (Apple stock price drops by half in one day.)

September 2000: Apple introduces a new iBook computer. It features 366-MHz G3 processor, 64 MB RAM, 10 GB hard drive, ATI Rage Mobility 128 with 8 MB SDRAM, CD-ROM drive, 56 kbps modem, 10/100BaseT Ethernet, USB port, FireWire port, Video out port, 12.1-inch display, iMovie 2 software, case colored indigo or key lime. Price is US$1499.

September 2000: Apple introduces a new iBook Special Edition computer. It is similar to the regular iBook, but with 466 MHz G3 processor, DVD-ROM drive, and case colored graphite or key lime. Price is US$1799.

September 2000: The price of Apple stock drops 52% to US$25.

September 1, 2000: Apple begins shipping the new iMac computer. It features a 350 MHz PowerPC G3 processor. It is availble in an indigo blue color case. Price is US$1199.

September 13, 2000: Apple releases the Mac OS X Public Beta. Price is US$29.95.

September 28, 2000: Apple announces it will fall short of revenue and profit expectations for the period July to

November 3, 2000: Columbia Pictures releases the film Charlie’s Angels. The motherboard of an Apple PowerMac G3 can be seen as part of a mainframe computer.

December 2000: Apple Computer shipped 1.6 million iMacs worldwide during the year.

Bibliography:

  • Chronology of Events in the History of Microcomputers: islandnet.com/~kpolsson/comphist.
  • Apple History: http://www.apple-history.com.
  • Wikipedia.
  • iWoz: Computer Geek to Cult Icon: How I Invented the Personal Computer, Co-Founded Apple, and Had Fun Doing It. 2007. by Steve Wozniak and Gina Smith.
  • Steve Jobs by Walter Isaacson.

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