Apple Display

Apple designed, manufactured and sold a wide variety of computer displays throughout its history. You’ll learn everything about Apple Displays on these pages.

Apple Display

Apple Display

Apple started manufacturing its monitors in 1980, when the Monitor III was introduced to match the Apple II and the Apple III computers. Since that four generations of CRT displays were introduced, as well as Apple LCDs which started with Apple Flat Panel display. Portable displays followed, and at the end of the 20th century external displays the first desktop flat-panel display was launched. Apple Cinema Display, whose first version appeared on the market in August 1999, marked a new era of Apple monitors. Today Apple Thunderbolt models are the only Apple’s external displays marketed by the company. The long history of Apple displays is marked by many new solutions, such as the introduction of the first color monitors, LCD displays, flat panel displays, portable displays and so on… The first Cinema Display was released in September 1999, and was available in different sizes. The Thunderbolt Display was introduced in July 2011.After many changes and improvements, Apple discontinued the Apple Cinema Display. Today the Thunderbolt Display is the only Apple display marketed directly by the company.

Apple Displays

Apple Displays 1st Gen

Apple Displays 1st Gen

Monitor III - CRT-based monochrome monitor (green phosphor or a white phosphor).

Monitor II - Cathode ray tube (CRT) based monochrome monitor. 

Monitor IIc - Miniature 9″ screen was introduced to help complement its compact size.

Monitor 100 - First CRT monitor designed for the Apple III and Apple IIe families of personal computers.

Monitor IIe - Manufactured for the Apple II personal computer line, later renamed to AppleColor Composite Monitor IIe.

Color Monitor IIc - Renamed to Apple Color Composite Monitor IIc.

AppleColor RGB Monitor - Marketed as AppleColor High-Resolution RGB Monitor, "the ideal companion for your Apple computer in both design and usability".

Apple Displays 2nd Gen

performa plus display

Apple Macintosh Color Display - released in conjunction with the Macintosh IIvi and Macintosh IIvx computers.

Macintosh Two Pages Monochrome Display - Introduced with the MAC IIcx and the Macintosh Two-Page Monochrome Video Card, this was Apple’s first 2-page monitor for the Macintosh. 

Macintosh Portrait Display - Introduced in March 1989, this model was Apple’s first full-page monitor for the Macintosh. It had a vertical alignment of the screen 

Macintosh 12'' RGB Display - The model was introduced with the Mac LC in October 1999. It uses a 13″ Sony Trinitron CRT, which is curved horizontally but flat vertically. The monitor can sit on top of most desktop Macs.

Macintosh Performa Plus Display - this model was a low-end Goldstar-built 14″ monitor designed and fabricated for the Macintosh Performa series.

Apple Displays 4th Gen

Apple Displays 4th Gen

The fourth generation of Apple displays was introduced in 1999. Designed with a translucent look, they were available in a 17'' Diamondtron and a 21'' Trinitron CRT (both driven by an LG-Manufactured chassis. The last Apple external CRT display was introduced in 2000 along with the Power Mac G4 Cube.

Apple Cinema Display
Apple Thunderbolt Display

Apple Cinema Displays

Apple Cinema Display Original (22-Inch) - Introduced in September 1999, the flat panel Apple Cinema Display features a 22-inch computer monitor, developed by by Apple Inc.

Apple Cinema Display ADC (20-Inch) - an active-matrix LCD matte display with maximum resolution of 1680 x 1050 pixels.

Apple Cinema Display HD (High Definition, 23-inch) - an active-matrix LCD matte display with maximum resolution of 1920 x 1200 pixels.

Apple Cinema Display ADC (22-Inch) - an active-matrix LCD matte display with maximum native resolution of 1600 x 1024 pixels.

Apple Cinema Display LED (24-Inch) - meant to companion the laptops with small displays and a Mini DisplayPort (earlier Macs aren’t supported): the MacBook, MacBook Pro, and MacBook Air.

Apple Cinema Display (20-Inch, Aluminum) - great departure in design. Meant to complement the Apple hi-end products, such as Power Macintosh G5 and PowerBook G4 models.

Apple Cinema Display (23-Inch, Aluminum) - meant to complement the Apple hi-end products, such as Power Macintosh G5 and PowerBook G4 models.

Apple Cinema Display LED (27-inch) - meant to companion the laptops with a Mini DisplayPort (earlier Macs aren’t supported): the MacBook, MacBook Pro, and MacBook Air, as well as desktops featuring the same very port.

Apple Cinema Display (30-Inch, Aluminum) - meant to complement the Apple hi-end products, such as Power Macintosh G5 and PowerBook G4 models.

Apple Thunderbolt Display

Apple Thunderbolt Display (27-Inch) - Introduced in July 2011 and discontinued in 2016, this Apple Thunderbolt model is a companion of a Thunderbolt-featured Mac laptop only.

Links

Apple Cinema HD Display (30-Inch, Aluminum)

Apple Cinema HD Display (30-inch, aluminum) is meant to complement the Apple hi-end products, such as Power Macintosh G5 and PowerBook G4 models. It got an anodized aluminum casing with a slight bezel mounted on an aluminum stand with an adjustable hinge.
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Apple Thunderbolt Display (27-Inch)

Introduced in July 2011 and discontinued in summer of 2016, Apple Thunderbolt Display (27-inch) is to companion a Thunderbolt-featured Mac laptop only. It features a built-in Thunderbolt / MagSafe octopus cable, a Gigabit Ethernet port and a FireWire “800” port in addition to three USB 2.0 ports, an integrated FaceTime HD web-camera, a mic, and 2.1 speakers system with a subwoofer. The Thunderbolt / MagSafe cable can also charge the laptops, turning the display in a dock station. (more…)

Apple Cinema Display LED (27-Inch)

Apple Cinema Display LED (27-inch) is meant to companion the laptops with a Mini DisplayPort (earlier Macs aren’t supported): the MacBook, MacBook Pro, and MacBook Air, as well as desktops featuring the same very port. It has an anodized aluminum casing with a slight bezel (but wider than that of its predecessor) mounted on an aluminum stand with an adjustable hinge.  (more…)

Apple Cinema Display (23-Inch, Aluminum)

Apple Cinema Display (23-inch, aluminum) is meant to complement the Apple hi-end products, such as Power Macintosh G5 and PowerBook G4 models. It got an anodized aluminum casing with a slight bezel mounted on an aluminum stand with an adjustable hinge. (more…)

Apple Cinema Display (20-Inch, Aluminum)

Apple Cinema Display (20-inch, aluminum) was a great departure in design. Meant to complement the Apple hi-end products, such as Power Macintosh G5 and PowerBook G4 models, it got an anodized aluminum casing with a slight bezel mounted on an aluminum stand with an adjustable hinge.  (more…)

Apple Cinema Display LED (24-Inch)

Apple Cinema Display LED (24-inch) is meant to companion the laptops with small displays and a Mini DisplayPort (earlier Macs aren’t supported): the MacBook, MacBook Pro, and MacBook Air. It has an anodized aluminum casing with a slight bezel (but wider than that of its predecessor) mounted on an aluminum stand with an adjustable hinge.  (more…)

Apple Cinema Display HD (23-Inch)

Apple Cinema Display HD (High Definition, 23-inch) is an active-matrix LCD matte display with maximum resolution of 1920 x 1200 pixels. As the moniker HD implies, this display is designed for HDTV content playback. It has higher contrast ratio, brightness and wider viewing angle which enhance the viewing experience greatly. (more…)

Apple Cinema Display (20-Inch)

Apple Cinema Display ADC (20-inch) is an active-matrix LCD matte display with maximum resolution of 1680 x 1050 pixels. It is enclosed in a high-density crystal-clear polycarbonate frame mounted on an easel-style stand with an integrated two port USB hub and an ADC (Apple Display Connector) for analog and digital video input\output, USB data transferring and power supply. (more…)

Apple Cinema Display Error Codes

Apple corporation engineers provided a signal system to inform the user about possible faults and errors which can occur to their Cinema Displays. Apple Cinema Displays use their power LED (lower right corner) to inform a user about faults and errors. If any of them occurs, the LED will blink in a certain Morse-style pattern. (more…)

Apple Cinema Display Original (22-Inch)

Introduced in September 1999, the flat panel Apple Cinema Display features a 22-inch computer monitor, developed by by Apple Inc. In July 2000, Apple discontinued this device. The display was designed to match the colorful plastic of the Power Mac G3 and later the Power Mac G4. This model was enclosed in a high-density plastic frame with an easel-style stand. (more…)

Macintosh LC 520 Computer

The LC 520, also known as Performa 520, was a personal computer, a part of Apple Computer’s LC line of Macintosh computers. It was Apple’s attempt to create a viable all-in-one computer. The LC 620 came in one-piece case and proved to be a popular home model.  (more…)

Apple Multiple Scan 14 Display

Apple Multiple Scan 14 Display was a color monitor that supported a variety of resolutions, and had a built-in amplifier and stereo speakers for producing sounds and music. They connect with a cable that has a male miniature TRS connector on each end. (more…)

Apple Performa Plus Display

The Apple Performa Plus Display was a low-end Goldstar-built 14-inches monitor designed and fabricated for the Macintosh Performa series. Apple slightly modified this device to create the Apple Color Plus monitor, which was essentially the Performa Plus Display but in a nicer case. The Apple Color Plus Display also had a tilt & swivel stand. (more…)

Macintosh 12-Inch RGB Display

The Apple’s Macintosh 12-inch RGB Display was introduced with the Mac LC in October 1989. It uses a 13-inch Sony Trinitron CRT, which is curved horizontally but flat vertically. The monitor can sit on top of most desktop Macs. Apple recommended against using this monitor at maximum brightness and suggested using a screen saver to avoid phosphor burn caused by static elements on the screen, such as the Menu bar, Drive icon, and Trash. This monitor is compatible with a limited number of Macs and video cards (see below). The case was used for both the 12-inch RGB display and the 12-inch monochrome display. (more…)

Macintosh Portrait Display

Introduced in March 1989, the Macintosh Portrait Display was Apple’s first full-page monitor for the Macintosh. It had a vertical alignment of the screen and was able to display one page. It used a 15-inch vertical grayscale CRT. (more…)

Macintosh Two-Page Monochrome Display

Introduced with the MAC IIcx and the Macintosh Two-Page Monochrome Video Card, the 21-inch Macintosh Two-Page Monochrome Display was Apple’s first 2-page monitor for the Macintosh. The monitor can sit on top of most desktop Macs and was designed to complement the 11.9-inches wide Mac IIcx. It worked with the Apple Universal Monitor Stand. (more…)

Apple Macintosh Color Display

The Apple Macintosh Color Display was released in conjunction with the Macintosh IIvi and Macintosh IIvx computers. The Macintosh Color Display 16-inch and 21-inch models were also introduced in 1992 with resolutions of 832 x 624 and 1152 x 870. (more…)

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